Blog

5 Things Every Student Who Wants a Career in Global Health Should Know in GIFs

September 15, 2014 By Elisabeth Wilhelm
Class of 2014-2015

Maybe it was a documentary, a friend from church who came back from a mission trip to Peru or South Africa who came back with stories, or a parent who is a doctor or nurse—there are many early influences on teens that lead them to consider studying and a career path working toward global health…. Read More…

Halting Ebola – Midwives, Tablets, and a Little Bit of Perseverance

September 8, 2014 By Margaret North
Class of 2014-2015

In the midst of the largest Ebola outbreak on record, one international partnership has worked together to provide assessment, education and diagnostic tools to front-line health workers, primarily midwives, in one state in Nigeria. The necessity for a rapid and systematic response to Ebola is essential. Early identification of cases as well as having a… Read More…

What the World Can Learn From Africa

August 19, 2014 By Lindsey Kinsinger
Class of 2013-2014

Thirteen months ago, one of our Ugandan co-fellows, and one of the smartest, funniest, most beautiful, and humble people I know (Lorraine Kabunga) asked a presenter at our GHC Orientation “What can Africa teach the world?” Honestly, I do not remember the presenter’s response. Still, this question is something I kept on my mind throughout… Read More…

Words from a Newly Minted GHC Alum

August 19, 2014 By Marian Brown
Class of 2013-2014

“Don’t ask what the world needs, ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” – Howard Thurman Throughout the fellowship year Global Health Corps spoke to us about the importance of public narrative in advocacy and our work as public servants. They utilized… Read More…

The Power of Stories and Advocacy

August 7, 2014 By GHC Team
Class of 2014-2015

One of GHC’s leadership practices – a skill we seek when recruiting, selecting, and training GHC  fellows – is the ability to inspire and mobilize others in the pursuit of health equity. For our fellows to have the maximum impact on the health of the communities they serve, both during and after their GHC placements,… Read More…

Climate Change is a Huge Barrier to Health Equity

July 29, 2014 By Zeno Masereka
Class of 2013-2014

As you read this, tens of thousands in the foothills of Mt. Rwenzori have lost their loved ones in the last two years, and their community hospital has been totally destroyed by devastating floods. Other millions are displaced from their homes in the Balkans and a quarter of Bosnia went without clean water all at… Read More…

Choosing between rocks and mud: the privilege of prevention

July 28, 2014 By Katherine Williams
Class of 2013-2014

Here in Uganda, we’ve finally left the rainy season behind us. We still get occasional cooler, overcast days with interspersed showers but a few weeks ago it was like clockwork: Wake up to raindrops slashing the windowpanes and drumming on rooftops… Get ready for the day, pack a rag to wipe rain and clay from… Read More…

GHC and Teen Club

July 28, 2014 By Danielle Payne
Class of 2013-2014

Over the past year, during my time as a GHC fellow, I have had an incredible opportunity to work within the Monitoring and Evaluation Department at Lighthouse Trust, an organization, primarily functioning as an ART clinic, that is pioneering novel approaches to integrated HIV/AIDS care in Malawi.  Last January, just before our mid-year retreat, the… Read More…

Resiliency and Vulnerability in Global Health Leadership

July 27, 2014 By GHC Team
Class of 2014-2015

Over the past five years, we’ve learned that to effectively serve others and make an impact, global health leaders must engage in self-reflection and self-care. We are keeping those lessons in mind as we head into our annual Closing Retreat tomorrow with our outgoing class of 2013-2014 fellows who have just finished up their year… Read More…

Buses and Beans

July 25, 2014 By Meagan Hawes
Class of 2013-2014

As the fellowship year concludes, I have been searching for a caption.  Full disclosure: I don’t have one.  Nor do I expect to arrive at a phrase that is inclusive of all the brilliant and challenging moments this year has been. So instead, I decided I would share a caption story.  It is something small,… Read More…

Health Education Through an Artists’ Eyes

July 24, 2014 By Marian Brown
Class of 2013-2014

“Art is not what you see, but what you help others see.” ~ Edgar Degas This past weekend the Malawi-based GHC fellows met in Neno for our Community Engagement Event, a GHC supported initiative that brings fellows within country together for a group identified and led project. Neno is a rural area between Blantyre and… Read More…

An Awkward Moment for a Year of Dignity

July 23, 2014 By Chelsea Ducharme
Class of 2013-2014

“Does someone want to tell me how they feel when they have their period? Or how long their period lasts?” says Rebeka Kabugho, ACODEV Project Officer, to a classroom full of adolescent girls in an effort to break the ice about menstruation. At first the girls look around the room giggling, shy to share their personal… Read More…

Saying Goodbye

July 23, 2014 By Kelsey Nagel
Class of 2013-2014

With the end of the GHC fellowship looming large on the horizon, I find myself thinking about the way that it began. I still remember the first time my cofellow and I drove through a river and up a mountain to our placement site at Partners in Health in Neno, Malawi. We drove past the… Read More…

Theory vs. Practice: The Civil Servant Edition

July 22, 2014 By Kaylyn Koberna
Class of 2013-2014

When I was younger my father often quoted Yogi Berra during “teachable moments.” This might seem less than helpful on several levels; oddly, however, the more experience I gain in the public health sector, the more the paradox-prone Yankees star makes sense. Consider the following example: “In theory, there is no difference between theory and… Read More…

Being the first to know

July 22, 2014 By Samantha White
Class of 2013-2014

It was a Tuesday afternoon when I heard my phone ring at my desk. I glanced over and saw that it was Peter Gondwe, the executive director of Life Concern (LICO), a community-based organization in Rumphi, Malawi, that I’ve been working with over the past year. I picked up the call with my usual greeting… Read More…

A Toast to the Twenty-First Century Leaders

July 22, 2014 By Joan Nakirya Wakida
Class of 2013-2014

Leadership is a widely written and studied concept that I still struggle to define and explain exhaustively. The concept of leadership has evolved and is still evolving. I recall an era when leaders were defined primarily by outward traits. People were inevitably ushered into leadership roles if they portrayed traits of courage, intelligence, confidence, innovation… Read More…

Beginning of a New Story

July 21, 2014 By Ladislas Hibusu
Class of 2013-2014

I served this year as a guidance and counseling officer for a Christian organization that looked after orphaned and vulnerable children. Serving in that role gave me an opportunity to see firsthand the deep hurt and devastation that fatherlessness brings to a child’s life. I had the greatest chance and opportunity to read and hear… Read More…

Training Institute 2014 – The Power of Collective Impact

July 21, 2014 By GHC Team
Class of 2014-2015

At Global Health Corps, we know that the scope and complexity of global health challenges means we need to engage talented people across boundaries, borders, skill sets, organizations, industries, and perspectives to effect social change. As our sixth annual Training Institute ends and our 128 new fellows head off to their respective placement organizations for… Read More…

Diversity: A Blessing or Curse?

July 21, 2014 By Happy Zulu
Class of 2013-2014

A number of reasons may be given to explain why people differ in opinions, ideologies, attitudes or behaviors. It seems natural that people’s attitudes at one point or the other will always be different. This may be due to varied reasons such as different backgrounds in which different people are brought up, different personalities or… Read More…

Measuring the Moments

July 18, 2014 By Tara Daniel
Class of 2013-2014

We speak so often of metrics, key performance indicators, and monitoring improvement, but I continue to search for ways to conceptualize and measure progress. How does one capture those moments that add up to results that are certainly desired though not quantifiable, such as momentum and collaboration? How does one know if attitudes are changing,… Read More…

The wolf, the horse, the frog and the whale

July 18, 2014 By Virginia Roncaglione
Class of 2013-2014

How do you fit a frog, a humpback whale, a wolf, and a horse in a last floor apartment of Harlem, New York City? This is not a funny riddle (I guess it could be), but the actual question that we just formulated in our living room, after conducting a very intense discussion on totem… Read More…

A Dream Becomes a Reality

July 17, 2014 By Allan Kabunga
Class of 2013-2014

Under the mango tree they used to gather to find health solutions. These were HIV/AIDS affected and infected women of Lukojjo in Nama sub county Mukono district in Uganda. These peasants then came up with a community based organization called Mpoma Community HIV/AIDS initiative in the year 1999. The main aim of the organization was… Read More…

The Coffin Road

July 17, 2014 By Chrispine Ungapembe
Class of 2013-2014

They say “words create and words destroy.” What was just a name then, has turned into a reality that has manifested itself by being the first place that people think of when the death calls one of us. We destroyed a long-held fear of death by creating acceptance that death is a hopeless situation that… Read More…

Ideal Interventions – A Self reflection

July 11, 2014 By Lorraine Kabunga
Class of 2013-2014

A well functioning health care system encompasses a wide range of factors with a balance between prevention strategies and treatment. However, it is not clear at what point the two balance in the right measure. I have been involved in a demand generation campaign for improving treatment practice in the management of  diarrhea. As a… Read More…

Out of Bounds

July 4, 2014 By Krystal Rampalli
Class of 2013-2014

GHC has been an amazing experience, both professionally and personally, although not free of challenges. Prior to moving to Zambia, I had never been to Africa, let alone spent a whole lot of time outside of America, so getting used to how things are done here took a while. As I do not own a… Read More…

GHC Training 2014: Global Health and Development Overview

July 3, 2014 By GHC Team
Class of 2014-2015

We’ve just wrapped up our third day of Training – what a whirlwind of ideas, energy, and new connections! The first three days of Training are dedicated to providing an overview in global health and development, since fellows join GHC from a variety of backgrounds – for many people, this is their first foray into… Read More…

GHC’s Training Institute 2014 Has Begun!

June 29, 2014 By GHC Team
Class of 2014-2015

It’s our favorite time of year at Global Health Corps! This weekend, our 128 new fellows arrived at Yale University for our annual intensive Training Institute. They join us (jetlagged but excited!) from all corners of the globe: from as far as Zambia and Nepal to as close as New Jersey and New Orleans. Over… Read More…

The Untold Benefits of the GHC Felowship

June 26, 2014 By Zeno Masereka
Class of 2013-2014

Next month (July 2014) will be the last month of my fellowship placement at my host organisation – Action Africa Health International (AAHI) in Kyangwali refugee settlement, where I have had a wonderful fellowship year, I must say. AAHI is an African-led, international non-governmental organization, based in Nairobi, Kenya, that supports livelihood-challenged communities in East… Read More…

There is No Time to Lose

June 23, 2014 By Lonjezo Sithole
Class of 2013-2014

As the fellowship year is winding down, I thought there could no better time to highlight what I consider to be one of the bright spots in this fellowship. I can’t believe the year is already coming to an end, and there is no doubt these have been among the best months in my early… Read More…

National Health Care System In Uganda

June 19, 2014 By Lillian Nakisozi
Class of 2013-2014

Uganda has an organized national health system and health delivery in place within the strategic frame work and focus. (HSSIP 11,July 2010) The national health system is comprised of both private and public sectors. The private health sector is comprised of Private Not for Profit (PNFP), Private Health Practitioners (PHPs), and Traditional Contemporary Medicine Practitioners…. Read More…

My Newark: The Good, the Ugly and its Beauty

June 16, 2014 By Ayokunle Abogan
Class of 2013-2014

I have called New Jersey my home away from home (Nigeria) since 2006. Altogether, I have lived in the state for almost 7 years. Now, I work in Newark, N.J as a health policy fellow in the city’s health department. When I got the news of my acceptance to GHC, I was excited not only… Read More…

This blog is partially inspired by my belief that Africa has within itself the ability to self-propagate into the beautiful and successful continent that so many have dreamt of, and partially by a TED talk from a brilliant handsome Kenyan boy called Richard Terere. A TED-talk, I highly recommend to all those who seek solutions… Read More…

Menstrual Hygiene Management: A Path To Human Dignity

June 10, 2014 By Meagan Hawes
Class of 2013-2014

Some of my favorite moments this year have been unexpected conversations. Over Easter weekend, I was sitting by the local spring in Kibeho, the rural Rwandan community where Claude and I are serving our fellowship year, when a woman tapped me on the shoulder – Miriwe! Bonjour! Hello! – and sat down beside me.  Meet… Read More…

How many can we save / Why it matters for me.

June 6, 2014 By Marie Amelie Ntigulirwa
Class of 2013-2014

“Every day 1400 girls and women die giving birth and 99  percent of them are in developing countries” UNICEF, 2003. “More than 1 million babies die on the day of their birth every year” Save the Children, 2014. How many can we save? One? Two? A hundred? A thousand? As years come and pass the… Read More…

Accountabilities

June 5, 2014 By Melissa Mazzeo
Class of 2013-2014

One of the first things I noticed when I started working at Baylor-Uganda was the strange strings of numbers and letters everywhere, etched into tables and chairs, engraved into computers. It didn’t take long to understand what they were: identifiers to connect the items with their respective grant budget lines. And it didn’t take long… Read More…

Meditation, mindfulness, and working in global health

June 4, 2014 By Natalia Espejo
Class of 2013-2014

I’ve been (a little bit) high-strung for as long as I can remember. I speak quickly, walk quickly, and think quickly. When presented with a problem, I have a tendency to dissect its root causes and come up with a list of possible solutions before the person speaking to me has had a chance to… Read More…

The magic of having a healthy baby.

June 3, 2014 By Allan Kabunga
Class of 2013-2014

It’s always one’s dream to have a healthy baby at the right time. One may ask which is the right time to have a baby? While I have been practicing in the health field, I have come to learn that the right time is: When both partners are ready and willing to take on responsibility,… Read More…

Back to Basics

June 2, 2014 By Jonathan Cali
Class of 2013-2014

Have you ever had one of those “Oh Crap” moments when you realize something very bad or embarrassing is about to happen? Your heart starts pounding and your mind quickly flips through all possible scenarios only to find that they all end in complete shame, utter humiliation, extreme awkwardness. I had one of these experiences… Read More…

Working with the “Community”

May 28, 2014 By Tara Daniel
Class of 2013-2014

The idea of working with communities to achieve sustained, substantive progress on any social issue is well-supported. One of my inspirations for continuing to work in health is the prominence given to community-based approaches. Here in the US, my organization, the city of Newark’s Department of Child and Family Well-Being, is reviewing the Public Health… Read More…

From Hospitals to Villages

May 21, 2014 By Jean Luc Ugirashebuja
Class of 2013-2014

One of the topics that continues to cause debate among healthcare professionals in developing countries is the comparative value of clinical versus public health careers. There is a tendency to rate one over another. Some claims state that clinical practice is the heart of healthcare because doctors deal directly with sick people, who are the… Read More…

Essential Medicines -Supply bottlenecks in Uganda’s Public sector

May 20, 2014 By Lorraine Kabunga
Class of 2013-2014

The most often attributed causes for a stock out in a public health center in Uganda are  inefficiencies within the central warehouse system. For example, long lead times and under deliveries. While this may be true sometimes, it is hardly the primary problem in the supply of essential commodities. Here’s why. I have recently had… Read More…

GHC Reflections

May 19, 2014 By Thandiwe Ngoma
Class of 2013-2014

Stephanie and I are placed at the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation in Zambia as Monitoring and Evaluation fellows. In our capacity as M&E fellows, we created a mini questionnaire to reflect on our GHC experiences. Below are Stephanie’s responses to the questions. 1)      What have you enjoyed the most about the GHC fellowship? The… Read More…

A number of the African countries have adopted a strategic focus in the development of their respective Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) policies. This approach is based on the argument that for most underdeveloped African countries, there is the need to use ICTs as a broad-base enabler of their socio-economic development process as… Read More…

The Quest for Unity in the Understanding of Diversity

May 15, 2014 By Esnatt Gondwe
Class of 2013-2014

In the last two blog posts that I have written, the reoccurring theme has been: the importance of cohesion, collaboration, and oneness- in the process of development. When I read Paulo Coelho’s book, “The Alchemist”, the theme of oneness and mankind’s ability to share knowledge that transcends race, orientation, species, sex, nationality or religious beliefs reaffirmed… Read More…

Want to live out your values? Mind the gap!

May 14, 2014 By Katherine Williams
Class of 2013-2014

My co-fellows and I are somehow entering the final quarter of work in our placement sites. Our predecessors all warned us that the year would fly by, and sure enough, it’s nearly vanished before our eyes. Having completed seven months of the fellowship, we now have a unique view of our past, present, and future…. Read More…

A co-fellow check-in

May 12, 2014 By Stephanie Ahn
Class of 2013-2014

An innovative component of the GHC model is the pairing of an international fellow with a fellow from the host country within the same placement organization. Throughout the fellowship year, the co-fellow pair collaborates and supports each other, ideally creating lasting bonds and building each other’s capacity and skills. I feel so fortunate to have… Read More…

Promotion of health through cultural leaders

May 9, 2014 By Allan Kabunga
Class of 2013-2014

For a long time there has been a war between culture and modern medicine. This has clocked way back especially in most African countries and led to misinformation and the loss of many lives. To date so many people have had a change in their beliefs. There are many cultural leaders who have come up… Read More…

Band-Aid

May 7, 2014 By Chelsea Ducharme
Class of 2013-2014

I watched him for several minutes as he bent over, clapping his hands over his right knee. Wearing a blue and white shirt with brown shorts, the young boy seemed so frustrated with something. But what? Distracted and perplexed for several minutes, I finally peeked over to get a better look. There were flies buzzing… Read More…

Are we there yet?

May 6, 2014 By Daisy Nakasi
Class of 2013-2014

I have watched many movies portraying HIV/AIDS information and I would probably enjoy the entertaining bits of the movie more than the informative bits. I have, however, watched “Mothers and Sons”, a movie that has caused me to think more about HIV/AIDS.  ”Mothers and Sons” is the story of the mother of a young man… Read More…

The importance of emotional health in the fight against HIV/AIDS

May 5, 2014 By Amy McDonough
Class of 2013-2014

In the global health community, we often put psychosocial support on the back burner. We’re so focused on efforts with measurable outcomes—dispensing ARVs, building clinics, administering vaccinations—that we often fail to address the less tangible needs of our patients. The fact that they may be experiencing one of the most emotionally challenging periods of their… Read More…

Despite the past decade’s significant successes on reducing new HIV infections and AIDS related deaths worldwide, adolescents were the only group in which AIDS related deaths increased between 2001 and 2012. Furthermore, during the same period, young people (15-25yrs) accounted for 39% of all new HIV infections. There are currently about 1.8 billion adolescents alive… Read More…

Forging a New Discipline

April 30, 2014 By Colin Gerber
Class of 2013-2014

“Global Health is an attitude. It is about the universal nature of our human predicament. It is a statement about our commitment to health as a fundamental quality of liberty and equity.” – Richard Horton, Editor of The Lancet Whenever I mention my work overseas, I get met with skepticism nearly as often as curiosity…. Read More…

Are We Making Any Difference?

April 29, 2014 By Evelyn Ninsiima
Class of 2013-2014

On Dec 1st 2013, Mbarara town was coloured white and red; school uniforms, banners, red ribbons and T- shirts are all telling us how we are getting to Zero HIV new infections. They were the World AIDS Day National celebrations! These celebrations were held at the Bible Institute grounds in Nyamityobora ward, an area that… Read More…

Global Health and Open Source

April 28, 2014 By Brian Ssennoga
Class of 2013-2014

In the world of software, your best bet is open source software – usually – because, it comes free, has been developed by a community, and everyone working on it, depends on everyone else to review what they are doing to make it better. So you have heard of Open Source Operating Systems (Ubuntu, SuSE,… Read More…

Beyond a Good Health Care System Lies the Need For a Well Educated Society

April 25, 2014 By Peter Pindani
Class of 2013-2014

A health care system is the organization of people, institutions, and resources to deliver health care services to meet the health needs of target populations. However, as simple as the definition sounds, Health care systems are very complex and multi-faceted in nature. World Health Organization defines health care system as consisting of all organizations, people and actions whose primary intent is… Read More…

At the Point of Care

April 24, 2014 By Christina Allain
Class of 2013-2014

In the second half of my fellowship, I have a completely new project on my hands: supporting the use of a point-of-care CD4 diagnostic, the Alere Pima CD4 Analyzer. There are currently about 120 Pimas in-country and most of these are set up with USB modems and mobile network SIM cards that enable them to… Read More…

When calmness opens your ways

April 23, 2014 By Lambert Mugabo
Class of 2013-2014

With the demanding work that is required to overcome the perpetual challenges related to global health complexities, people find themselves in situations where they need different skills, beyond their area of expertise, to cope with multiple responsibilities. But what happens when despite the multiple skills that an individual possesses, the work does not go well?… Read More…

Uganda: Where did we go wrong?

April 21, 2014 By Moses Ariong
Class of 2012-2013

Uganda is a gifted country with a lot of natural resources, favorable weather conditions and an admired tourist centre. One would expect all of these opportunities to yield increased incomes among households, which would be essential in meeting household basic needs and improving on people’s wellbeing. In fact, the Uganda economy profile for 2013 shows… Read More…

One day not too long ago I walked into my bathroom here in Malawi and saw a spider scurry along one of the white-tiled walls. I am by no means well-versed in arachnids and can’t tell an innocuous garden spider from a potentially deadly black widow. This one’s body was fat, spotted, and tan and… Read More…

Young People Living with HIV/AIDS and Sexuality: What’s the deal?

April 15, 2014 By Christine Kaleeba
Class of 2013-2014

Few things are more rejuvenating than working with young people and I am privileged to be doing just that. I work for Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation in Uganda as an Advocacy and Communications Specialist. I have been at Baylor-Uganda for over six months and while much remains the same in terms of how… Read More…

Measuring Progress: Dashboard Designing

April 14, 2014 By Ladislas Hibusu
Class of 2013-2014

Monitoring and evaluation is a critical component of project success. It’s one of the powerful project and program measurement tools used to gauge progress and improvement over time, though it’s rarely used a dashboard. Before joining GHC and Afya Mzuri, I had not the slightest idea of what a scorecard or dashboard was in the… Read More…

As Seen on TV

April 10, 2014 By Krystal Rampalli
Class of 2013-2014

TV has been an amazing thing for the world. I personally love entertaining shows like “Breaking Bad” and news programmes like “60 Minutes.” But TV also gets a bad rap from many (and with good reason) for its regular portrayal of sex, drugs, crime and general overindulgence. The universal truth about TV is that it… Read More…

The Power of Empathy in Action

April 2, 2014 By Kiera Kenney
Class of 2013-2014

Recently I’ve been discouraged by the inaction of so many of my peers. Why don’t people feel more compelled to take action towards a more just society and world?  Why aren’t rights important enough to work towards or fight for? In a quest for understanding I wonder if the issues we face seem too large… Read More…

Back to School

April 1, 2014 By Nicolas Rivard
Class of 2013-2014

How can we comprehend sustainability in a context where that word does not exist? How can we fashion contemporary architecture appropriate to people and place without modern construction materials? How can a school in the Congolese jungle teach its students and its entire community? These are the sorts of questions I have had the opportunity… Read More…

Leap-frogging Development

March 31, 2014 By Delanie Ricketts
Class of 2013-2014

“Let’s focus on the opportunities, not the challenges,” my co-worker offered. In a conversation about reaching health care workers through internet-based platforms and applications, this was a bold statement. How could you not consider the fact that many of the health care workers we were trying to reach in rural areas didn’t have electricity? Yet,… Read More…

Sample Transport

March 28, 2014 By Chrispine Ungapembe
Class of 2013-2014

It’s quite mind blowing how we take a lot of things for granted and think…or rather not think that it could be a big deal for someone somewhere. Come to think of it, if something has already been deemed worthy of being taken for granted then who would have a minute to think of the… Read More…

Breast Feeding: A Fundamental Human Right

March 18, 2014 By Zeno Masereka
Class of 2013-2014

A new law in the United Arab Emirates makes it compulsory for mothers to breastfeed their babies for two years. Under the legislation a wet nurse will be provided for any woman who is unable to breastfeed for health reasons. This sounds like gagging mothers to do their duty and responsibility, and it sounds controversial… Read More…

Homosexuality: Understanding Human Diversity

March 13, 2014 By Fred Chitalu
Class of 2013-2014

I am led into writing about my experiences and opinion following the disheartening responses coming from fellow Africans on the continued homosexuality debate. I have had some peer debates on this issue both before and after becoming a Global Health Corps fellow through which some people may have or had different thoughts and questions about… Read More…

Key Takeaways from 2013

March 11, 2014 By Raymond Besiga
Class of 2011-2012

It’s been a bit. So, I thought to share a few lessons I learned from the past year, before the hype dies down and the takeaways evolve beyond the realm of 2013. They are in no specific order, and I warn you, I may rumble at times but here goes! Emerge from trying circumstances with… Read More…

We Don’t Care (or maybe we do).

March 10, 2014 By Casey Kilburn
Class of 2013-2014

My generation is commonly referred to as the “Millennials” (see also, “self-centered”, “over confident”, “entitled”, etc.) Roughly born between 1980-2000, the core of this generation is in their early 20′s-early 30′s. By this time most of us have likely held a variety of jobs, studied a variety of things, and most of us hold a… Read More…

Switching Lenses

March 4, 2014 By Evelyn Ninsiima
Class of 2013-2014

I remember that day in Yale when all fellows that were to be based in Uganda working on health systems quality improvement held a discussion on how to go about their kind of work, what it takes, and how to support each other. What immediately came to my mind was the question of what kind… Read More…

Getting to zero new HIV infections: Would mandatory testing get us there?

March 3, 2014 By Benon Mugulusi
Class of 2013-2014

“A lion that kills, is one that does not roar”, goes a famous Savannah grassland African saying. “It is one that crouches and lays quietly in the calmly swaying savannah grasses, patiently crawling behind its unsuspecting victims”, goes the saying with further elucidation. The savannah grassland residents’ question then is, “what if we burnt down… Read More…

The Chain Remains: Part II

February 28, 2014 By Maria Aldana
Class of 2013-2014

Even with all the structural barriers that formerly incarcerated people face, there are stories of hope and resilience.  This is not to say that re-entry is an easy or fair process.  As it is discussed in part one of this piece, written by Stephen Hicks, people face many barriers when they are out of prison. … Read More…

The Chain Remains: Part I

February 26, 2014 By Stephen Hicks
Class of 2013-2014

Prison is human storage, but worse because prisons attempt to strip away the dignity of those incarcerated. Look at the school-to-prison pipeline paradigm, mandatory minimum sentencing, crack/cocaine sentencing discrepancies, or the myriad of intended and unintended consequences from the “War of Drugs” and the “Get Tough on Crime” movements. But what is more alarming after… Read More…

Ten Years

February 25, 2014 By Katherine Williams
Class of 2013-2014

Humor me for a moment… Let your mind wander back in time. Let it meander over your life’s trail to where you were 10 years ago. What was your focus then? How did you spend your time? What did you hope the future would bring? I was 15—a high school freshman in a suburb of… Read More…

A Fabulist Imagines in Ruhiira

February 21, 2014 By Kai Cowger
Class of 2013-2014

Those who most intimately know me have said I have an overactive, irrepressible imagination. I have realized it is both a curse and a blessing.  A curse of finding myself trapped in an obsessive mind, a mind that can persuade me that the most dangerous fictional ideas I conjure are true.  A blessing of being… Read More…

The long road to ending unsafe abortion

February 18, 2014 By Morgan Garcia
Class of 2013-2014

When we were 17, a friend of mine got pregnant. When she told me she planned to terminate the pregnancy, I was relieved. She was one of my smartest friends, but like all of my friends, she was so young to me. I couldn’t imagine what life would be like for her or the baby…. Read More…

Speaking Truth to Silence

February 12, 2014 By Joya Taft-Dick
Class of 2013-2014

It’s incredible what putting an end to silence and fear can do. When AIDS first appeared on the scene in the U.S in the 70s, it was initially called the “gay-related immune deficiency.” It wasn’t until the mid-1980s that the Reagan administration even mentioned the word “AIDS” publicly. The stigma and discrimination that hounded this… Read More…

Universal access to HIV treatment as a Global Public Good

February 11, 2014 By Kudakwashe Dube
Class of 2013-2014

The concept of global public goods is a traditional way of classifying goods and services based on two factors: 1) rivalrous consumption and 2) excludability. Global public goods are non-rivalrous, meaning their use by one individual does not reduce their availability to others and they are non-excludable meaning people should not be prevented from accessing… Read More…

Six Month Highlights

February 10, 2014 By Christina Allain
Class of 2013-2014

My friends and family in the Northeast region of the United States will find this incomprehensible, but it is too hot to think straight in the mid-afternoon sun that streams through the window of our (very) well-lit new office. For a girl who spent 28 of the previous 29 holiday seasons in wintry Massachusetts, this… Read More…

Market Shaping- Improving access to ORS and Zinc

February 10, 2014 By Lorraine Kabunga
Class of 2013-2014

Diarrhea kills about 800,000 children each year, making it the second leading cause of death in children under five years worldwide. In Uganda diarrhea kills ~ 10,000 children every year, and is the third largest single cause of child mortality. Despite the existence of a simple, life-saving treatment (ORS[1] and Zinc), access to the medicines… Read More…

Work for the joy of it

February 7, 2014 By Kondwani Mmanga
Class of 2013-2014

Many nations in the world, especially in the developing world, are experiencing poor health indicators and high mortality rates. This has normally been attributed to brain drain, inadequate staff, inadequate drugs, corruption, environmental factors and health seeking behavior. In my opinion, health worker strikes are a barrier to public health and health equity, yet it… Read More…

The Nuts and Bolts of Better Health

February 6, 2014 By Kaylyn Koberna
Class of 2013-2014

This morning I sat down with the Maintenance Supervisor and Medical Engineer at Bwaila Hospital to go line-by-line through an exhaustive inventory of spare parts. Half inch galvanized sockets? Cut the quantity by half. Thousand-watt theatre halogen bulbs? Essential. Nine-volt rechargeable batteries? We will make do without. It was tedious, frustrating, and probably the most… Read More…

Snap Back to Reality — Why Cutting Funding for SNAP Cuts Our Nation’s Progress

February 6, 2014 By Elizabeth Agi
Class of 2013-2014

On August 28th, 1963, almost 300,000 people marched on the nation’s capital to listen to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. deliver the most powerful demand to end racism in history. On January 8th, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson declared the official intent of the United States government to put an end to poverty. We’re half a… Read More…

Whose Base Line?

February 5, 2014 By Marian Brown
Class of 2013-2014

On January 25th Zomba City health practitioners from across sectors came together to discuss the Zomba City Council Report on HIV and AIDS. I had the fortune to attend through representation of the Zomba-based NGO that I work for, as the Monitoring and Evaluation Fellow, the Art & Global Health Center Africa. I attended the… Read More…

HIV At-Home Test Kits in Malawi?

February 4, 2014 By Lindsey Kinsinger
Class of 2013-2014

The debate all began one year ago, in a lecture at my graduate school, Boston University. Are at-home HIV test kits ethical? Will they work? The presentation for the recently FDA-approved oral, at-home kits was given by an FDA employee, that was an integral member in the approval process. The audience was composed of public… Read More…

I have now completed six months holed up here in Kyangwali Refugee Camp doing primary health care activities at my placement organization, Action Africa Help International (AAHI). I came here in August 2013 as a Global Health Corps Fellow to serve as a Health Officer with AAHI under its refugee care program. AAH-I is an… Read More…

And so it began…

February 3, 2014 By Nicolas Rivard
Class of 2013-2014

It was the kind of warm, Rwandan morning that makes an expat forget they miss friends and family. Regina and I approached the gates of the Kigali Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) stadium dressed to the nines and buzzed by the excitement of a large crowd waiting to enter the event. We were attending… Read More…

The Pursuit of Hope in Global Health

January 31, 2014 By Esnatt Gondwe
Class of 2013-2014

My brother in-law recently shared this quote with me: “Hope is not the conviction that something will end well, but that it makes sense, no matter how it ends.”- Vaclav Havel  When I read this quote, it made me think about my fellowship year.  Before starting the fellowship I didn’t know what to expect. I… Read More…

Telling Our Stories, Raising Our Voices

January 29, 2014 By Ladislas Hibusu
Class of 2013-2014

A man far wiser and braver than I once said: “there will be times when we will be powerless to prevent injustice but let never be a time when we fail to protest.” The reason I am busy doing something every day of my life is because it keeps me in balance. In everything we… Read More…

Guest of Honor

January 28, 2014 By Lillian Nakisozi
Class of 2013-2014

At the age of fifteen I very much wanted to be an important person in the community. Think of those given front row seats labeled ‘reserved’ at functions, escorted to the front in case they took seats in the back, the ones who were given a microphone to speak last.  And they seemed to have… Read More…

The Role of the Community in Reducing Vulnerability Among Children

January 27, 2014 By Frank Atukunda
Class of 2013-2014

It has been six months now since I started my quality improvement work with URC USAID-ASSIST project Uganda. I joined the project in August 2013 as a Global Health Corps fellow working under the Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) program. The USAID –ASSIST OVC program aims to improve the quality of services offered to OVC… Read More…

Does Aid Work? Is That the Right Question?

January 24, 2014 By Jonathan Cali
Class of 2013-2014

A group of young professionals working in the international development industry sat down to discuss questions that have been debated for years by academics and practitioners such as Jeffrey Sachs, Dambisa Moyo, and Bill Easterly. Have international development organizations been successful? Does foreign aid work? The young professionals launched into a lively debate, with some… Read More…

Living Your Story

January 17, 2014 By Tiffany Aquino
Class of 2012-2013

While reflecting on 2013 over the past couple weeks, I took some time to review my blog posts from my time last year as a GHC fellow in Rwanda. This is a post from about 8 months into my fellowship experience and right after my birthday (with some new alterations to post here). Looking at it… Read More…

Havel Plays

January 16, 2014 By Bowie Daniel Hall
Class of 2013-2014

Lest one brook misapprehension at nomothetic developments in Kampala, the government of Uganda must rightly attend to myriad problems that indeed do pose serious threat to the diverse and growing populace it represents. Despite the country’s well-publicized success in reducing HIV/AIDS prevalence since the 1980s, Uganda continues to suffer among the highest rates of this… Read More…

13

January 15, 2014 By Jourdan Schiffer McGinn
Class of 2012-2013

It’s 2014….already? I can’t even begin to discern (says the good Jesuit in me) what 2013 was or the ways in which it changed me. But, here’s what I may have learned in 2013… 1. Kindness is the most important currency the world has to offer. As I have wandered into places far from my… Read More…

Mental Health and Illness: At home and abroad

January 14, 2014 By Jennifer Gottesfeld
Class of 2011-2012

Nick Kristof really hit the nail on the head in his Sunday column in the New York Times “First Up, Mental Illness. Next Topic Is Up to You,” where he called out mental illness as one of the major issues systematically neglected to be given the seriousness and attention it deserves. Mental illness is still… Read More…

A Deadly Dinner

January 13, 2014 By Edward Otim
Class of 2013-2014

Normally when people talk about global health and, more specifically, environmental health, they tend to focus on the big, flashy threats – floods, droughts, and toxic waste pollution, to name a few. But sometimes the most innocent and hidden/silent of activities can cause the greatest harm. For the greater part of my life, especially my… Read More…

Loving and Serving the Community

January 10, 2014 By Peter Wampaalu Balyawula
Class of 2013-2014

  Global Health Corps is a leadership and professional development fellowship program for emerging global health leaders. It works to improve the lives of people in communities by ensuring social justice and health equity for all. ACODEV-Uganda, my placement organization, works to improve the lives of people in the community, especially the hard to reach… Read More…

Find It. Share It. Solve It.

January 9, 2014 By Brian Ssennoga
Class of 2013-2014

In my first 6 months of the Global Health Corp Fellowship, while placed with Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, I have gotten immersed in programs about the eradication of  HIV/AIDS. I am now working closely with a group of young people, known as Ariel Ambassadors, and it’s a great honor to understand what it means… Read More…